Cyclone Rake Blog: Homeowners in the South
Showing posts with label Homeowners in the South. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Homeowners in the South. Show all posts

Friday, January 6, 2017

Best Practices for Cleaning Up Leaf Debris in the South


Lawns and gardens grow longer in the South, where milder winters may mean more time to clean up leaves and yard debris. Here are some best practices for cleaning up leaves and lawn debris in the South - whether you’re catching up on raking, cleaning up debris from pruning or a winter storm, or just thinning out pine needles from under your trees.
            Large leaf rakes make cleaning up small and mid-sized yards easy. Raking is also a great way to get some winter exercise and enjoy being in the colder season. Many
Brilliantly colored tree in Alabama
homeowners shred small piles of leaves, using a lawnmower or chipper/shredder, to make mulch. Shredding also makes composting leaves easier. Composting is a great practice that can help make your yard neater, and shredded leaves are a useful ingredient for compost, when mixed with other organic wastes in the compost pile or compost bin.
            Large yards with more deciduous trees, as well as yards with mature pines and other evergreens, can see even more leaves and pine needles.
Long Needle Pine Tree in North Carolina 
Rakes and leaf blowers are useful for cleaning up larger yards. A Cyclone Rake leaf vacuum, which attaches to a riding lawnmower, makes cleaning up leaves and pine needles easier and less time-consuming. The Cyclone Rake and its attachments can also be used for year-round yard cleanup chores.
            Homeowners in the South can take a two-step approach when dealing with small tree branches, as well as disease-free shrub clippings and prunings. Branches and prunings can be first gathered into neat piles – or left just out of sight, behind the trees or shrubs where they are pruned. After some time has passed, leaves will fall off or can be easily shaken off, making it easier to move the stems and branches. The leaves can then be tidily raked into mulch around the plants, used as mulch elsewhere, or added to the compost pile. Branches can be shredded or added to a brush pile for birds and wildlife to enjoy the rest of winter.


Reviewed (mentions leaving branches behind pruned plants):